Emperor Penguins on Ice

Emperor Penguins on Ice

Video. Learn how penguins propel themselves on to the ice, out of the water.

Grades

6 - 12+

Subjects

Arts and Music, Biology, Photography, Physics

Selected text level

This video is from the December 2012 iPad edition of National Geographic magazine. Find more interactive content, photos, and videos in the iPad version of National Geographic magazine.

Fast Fact

  • Emperor penguins are the largest of all penguins. An average bird stands about 115 centimeters (45 inches) tall. These flightless animals live on the Antarctic ice and in the frigid surrounding waters. It is an incredibly harsh environment. Wind chills can reach -60C (-76F).

Fast Fact

  • At sea, emperor penguins can dive to 565 meters (1,850 feet)—deeper than any other bird—and stay under for more than 20 minutes.

Fast Fact

  • Male and female emperors take turns going out to sea to feed. Females lay a single egg and then promptly leave it behind. They undertake an extended hunting trip that lasts about two months, during which they feed on fish, squid, and krill. Male emperors stay behind and keep the eggs warm, protecting them from the elements until they hatch. The females return and bring a full belly of food that they regurgitate for the newly hatched chicks. Meanwhile, their duty done, male emperors take to the sea in search of food for themselves.

Fast Fact

  • Emperor penguins can weigh up to 40 kilograms (88 pounds).
Media Credits

The audio, illustrations, photos, and videos are credited beneath the media asset, except for promotional images, which generally link to another page that contains the media credit. The Rights Holder for media is the person or group credited.

Editor
National Geographic Society, National Geographic Society
Producers
Sean P. O'Connor,
Samantha Zuhlke, National Geographic Society
other
Last Updated

May 20, 2022

For information on user permissions, please read our Terms of Service. If you have questions about licensing content on this page, please contact ngimagecollection@natgeo.com for more information and to obtain a license. If you have questions about how to cite anything on our website in your project or classroom presentation, please contact your teacher. She or he will best know the preferred format. When you reach out to him or her, you will need the page title, URL, and the date you accessed the resource.

Media

If a media asset is downloadable, a download button appears in the corner of the media viewer. If no button appears, you cannot download or save the media.

Text

Text on this page is printable and can be used according to our Terms of Service.

Interactives

Any interactives on this page can only be played while you are visiting our website. You cannot download interactives.

Related Resources